The elaboration of Viagra (brand name of Sildenafil) is the third largest accidental discovery in medicine after X-rays and penicillin. The researchers who discovered the properties of sildenafil were awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize. In 1992, the Pfizer company in Sandwich (Great Britain) carried out tests on a new drug - Sildenafil citrate, which was manufactured for the treatment of many heart diseases.

The manufacturers planned that Sildenafil citrate would serve to increase the blood flow to the heart muscle and to lower the blood pressure. But during the tests, it was found that sildenafil citrate did not significantly affect myocardial blood circulation or blood pressure. It was also noted that some participants in the male experiment did not want to return the tablets after completing the exams. The reason for this was a sudden improvement in erectile function in everyone. In this way, despite the fact that sildenafil did not have a significant effect on the blood circulation in the heart muscle, the drug caused sufficient blood flow to the male genital organs.

Scholars from the Pfizer pharmacological society did not neglect such an unexpected property of sildenafil citrate and recognized it as a good means of managing erectile dysfunction. So the potency drug Viagra appeared, the name was thought up as the combination of the words “Vigor” (strength, power) and Niagara (Niagara Falls) - the largest waterfall in North Africa.

Long-term clinical trials to confirm the properties of Viagra have been conducted since 1993, confirming the effectiveness and harmlessness of Viagra in the treatment of erectile dysfunction. Finally, the use of the potency drug was approved by the United States Department of Medicines. Viagra's effectiveness has been tested by over 3,000 men of various ages with erectile dysfunction for more than 26 years due to psychological, physical, or mixed psychological and physical factors.

According to the results of these tests, Viagra's effectiveness in rebuilding healthy erections and improving successful sexual intercourse in many patients, including diabetes, spinal cord injuries or other accompanying clinical conditions, and in patients taking many medicines at the same time, has been confirmed.